Support for Texas Children’s Comes in All Sizes

A group of first graders and their teachers recently demonstrated how education and charity can work together to create remarkable outcomes. No matter how large or small, donations can make a big difference at Texas Children’s Hospital.

The First Graders from Presbyterian School Present Their Donation to Texas Children's Hospital

This past year at Presbyterian School in Houston’s Museum District, two first grade teachers, Megan Blandford and Rachel Hadcock, came up with an educational project to benefit their students and the greater Houston community. As part of their math curriculum last fall, the students were taught how to count using coin combinations. In order to teach the students how to apply this new skill to real life situations, the first graders were assigned a project that required them to collect spare change throughout the year and individually count their coins. The students then researched, selected and visited an organization to which they could donate the money at the end of the year.

The first graders presented their project, made posters and placed milk jugs around the school campus to collect any spare change from other students and the community. Eventually, the class selected Texas Children’s Hospital as the recipient of their collected money. In March, the entire class took a field trip to learn more about the hospital. At the end of the school year, Blandford and Hadcock gave each student an individual bag of coins to count, then the class worked together to add up the grand total of their donation.

In all, the students raised and donated a total of $601.46 to Texas Children’s to support the hospital’s area of greatest need, proving that anyone, young or old, can make a difference for our community.


 Our purpose is simple – heal sick children. We invite you to join us.
Visit:
www.healsickchildren.org.

 

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